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Difference between revisions of "Hayashi Soken"

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Sôken was a son of [[Hayashi Teiu]], born in [[Edo]]. In [[1846]], he became the 10th head of the Hayashi family and inherited the title of Daigaku-no-kami.
 
Sôken was a son of [[Hayashi Teiu]], born in [[Edo]]. In [[1846]], he became the 10th head of the Hayashi family and inherited the title of Daigaku-no-kami.
  
In [[1853]], he was one of a team of scholars and officials assigned by the shogunate to translate official diplomatic documents presented to the shogunate by [[Commodore Perry]].
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In [[1853]], he was one of a team of scholars and officials assigned by the shogunate to translate official diplomatic documents presented to the shogunate by [[Commodore Perry]].<ref>Ishin Shiryô Kôyô 維新史料綱要, vol 1 (1937), 432.</ref>
  
 
Hayashi died later that year.
 
Hayashi died later that year.
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==References==
 
==References==
 
*"[https://kotobank.jp/word/%E6%9E%97%E5%A3%AE%E8%BB%92-1102196 Hayashi Soken]," ''Nihon jinmei daijiten Plus'' 日本人名大辞典+Plus, Kodansha.
 
*"[https://kotobank.jp/word/%E6%9E%97%E5%A3%AE%E8%BB%92-1102196 Hayashi Soken]," ''Nihon jinmei daijiten Plus'' 日本人名大辞典+Plus, Kodansha.
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<references/>
  
 
[[Category:Scholars and Philosophers]]
 
[[Category:Scholars and Philosophers]]
 
[[Category:Edo Period]]
 
[[Category:Edo Period]]

Latest revision as of 02:37, 19 November 2019

  • Born: 1828
  • Died: 1853
  • Titles: Daigaku-no-kami
  • Other Names: 林健 (Hayashi Takeshi)
  • Japanese: 壮軒 (Hayashi Souken)

Hayashi Sôken was a late Edo period Confucian scholar, head for a time of the Hayashi family advisors to the Tokugawa shoguns.

Sôken was a son of Hayashi Teiu, born in Edo. In 1846, he became the 10th head of the Hayashi family and inherited the title of Daigaku-no-kami.

In 1853, he was one of a team of scholars and officials assigned by the shogunate to translate official diplomatic documents presented to the shogunate by Commodore Perry.[1]

Hayashi died later that year.

[edit] References

  • "Hayashi Soken," Nihon jinmei daijiten Plus 日本人名大辞典+Plus, Kodansha.
  1. Ishin Shiryô Kôyô 維新史料綱要, vol 1 (1937), 432.
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