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(Created page with "*''Other Names'': 彪 ''(Takeki)'', 誠之進 ''(Seinoshin)'' *''Japanese'': 藤田 虎之助 ''(Fujita Toranosuke)'' Fujita Toranosuke was a notable Mito han ''[[kar...")
 
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Fujita Toranosuke was a notable [[Mito han]] ''[[karo|karô]]'' (House Elder) of the [[Bakumatsu period]].
 
Fujita Toranosuke was a notable [[Mito han]] ''[[karo|karô]]'' (House Elder) of the [[Bakumatsu period]].
  
He was placed under house arrest by the shogunate along with former lord of Mito [[Tokugawa Nariaki]] and fellow ''karô'' [[Toda Ginjiro|Toda Ginjirô]]; Toda and Fujita were released, however, on [[1846]]/12/28, while Nariaki remained confined for a time.
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He was placed under house arrest by the shogunate along with former lord of Mito [[Tokugawa Nariaki]] and fellow ''karô'' [[Toda Ginjiro|Toda Ginjirô]]; Toda and Fujita were released, however, on [[1846]]/12/28, while Nariaki remained confined for a time. Fujita then joined a number of other Mito retainers in actively pushing for Nariaki's exoneration and release.
  
 
By [[1853]], Toda and Fujita were actively engaged in petitioning the shogunate to allow for Nariaki's involvement in discussions or policy decisions regarding foreign relations and coastal defense; they were eventually successful, and Nariaki was formally brought into policy discussions.
 
By [[1853]], Toda and Fujita were actively engaged in petitioning the shogunate to allow for Nariaki's involvement in discussions or policy decisions regarding foreign relations and coastal defense; they were eventually successful, and Nariaki was formally brought into policy discussions.

Revision as of 20:18, 4 December 2019

  • Other Names: 彪 (Takeki), 誠之進 (Seinoshin)
  • Japanese: 藤田 虎之助 (Fujita Toranosuke)

Fujita Toranosuke was a notable Mito han karô (House Elder) of the Bakumatsu period.

He was placed under house arrest by the shogunate along with former lord of Mito Tokugawa Nariaki and fellow karô Toda Ginjirô; Toda and Fujita were released, however, on 1846/12/28, while Nariaki remained confined for a time. Fujita then joined a number of other Mito retainers in actively pushing for Nariaki's exoneration and release.

By 1853, Toda and Fujita were actively engaged in petitioning the shogunate to allow for Nariaki's involvement in discussions or policy decisions regarding foreign relations and coastal defense; they were eventually successful, and Nariaki was formally brought into policy discussions.

References

  • Ishin Shiryô Kôyô 維新史料綱要, vol 1 (1937), 54, 106, 112, 435, 448, 450, 506.
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